Residency Participants

Deborah Kapoor   The Pull  Mixed Media 88 x 172 inches 2018  Within this wall piece are garments I have worn, literally ‘wearing’ the role of mother and daughter, as my body is in a gravitational pull in two directions. I am drawn in by a mother who needs care and a son who needs a mother, not yet a man. It’s a dance between two ends of the spectrum, and I can’t give up either.

Deborah Kapoor

The Pull

Mixed Media
88 x 172 inches
2018

Within this wall piece are garments I have worn, literally ‘wearing’ the role of mother and daughter, as my body is in a gravitational pull in two directions. I am drawn in by a mother who needs care and a son who needs a mother, not yet a man. It’s a dance between two ends of the spectrum, and I can’t give up either.

 
 

Deborah Kapoor

The FOLDED RESIDENCY AT M. DAVID & CO., Bushwick, NY. December 10th through the 17th, 2018

The theme for this residency was “Folded” - based on the concept of folding into oneself, folding into another and how we hide and reveal within our art.  I worked with Michael David via Facetime for a month prior to the residency, discussing the concept for the work in order to prepare for my time in Bushwick.  The goal was to create specific work for the gallery, and then through interaction with the other artist participants, along with guest crits from Paul D’Agostino and teacher Farrell Brickhouse, and the many conversations with Michael, to evolve the concepts into a unified exhibit.  

Having the feedback from Michael and input from participating studio artists was an experience which has expanded my vocabulary and scale of working. With a combination of worn, new, and painted fabric, I made wall-mounted structures that suggest the push/pull I feel between being a parent and being a daughter.

 
 
Deborah Kapoor   Dervish  Mixed Media 108 x 108 inches 2018  There is a sense of play within this piece, but gravity as well. I have assembled overlapping layers of fabric, some which I’ve manipulated with paint on the surface. Others are garments I have worn to create a structure of celebration, including a salwar kameez, worn as the wife of an East Indian and mother to a half-Indian son – the history of toy animals to the great feminine divine – encompassing the dance between mothers and sons, whirling, as if to transcend the body:  This is the day Whirl around your love Nothing is amiss Whirl After all No one can blame The friends of heart for this  --From the Sufi poet Rumi

Deborah Kapoor

Dervish

Mixed Media
108 x 108 inches
2018

There is a sense of play within this piece, but gravity as well. I have assembled overlapping layers of fabric, some which I’ve manipulated with paint on the surface. Others are garments I have worn to create a structure of celebration, including a salwar kameez, worn as the wife of an East Indian and mother to a half-Indian son – the history of toy animals to the great feminine divine – encompassing the dance between mothers and sons, whirling, as if to transcend the body:

This is the day
Whirl around your love
Nothing is amiss
Whirl
After all
No one can blame
The friends of heart for this

--From the Sufi poet Rumi

Deborah Kapoor   The Seams  I’m really talking about where things are hanging together by a thread, or being ripped apart — a self-portrait, feeling split.   Deborah Kapoor website

Deborah Kapoor

The Seams

I’m really talking about where things are hanging together by a thread, or being ripped apart — a self-portrait, feeling split.

Deborah Kapoor website

Joey Brock

Joey Brock  “Hide and Seek”

Joey Brock “Hide and Seek”

Joey Brock

In December 2018 I participated in the M. David & Co. artist residency in the Bushwick area of Brooklyn, NY for one week.  Working with Michael David (artist, curator and gallerist, visionary and general bad ass) and through the assistance of Program Director Bonny Leibowitz, I embarked on what would be a career changing experience.

Through critical dialogue with Michael David and Professor Emeritus and Chairman of the Dry Erase Board Paul D'Agostino as well as the artist camaraderie, I witnessed an amazing amount of growth in a very short time (5 days) influencing me to take many risks and to jump further than ever before.  It was a leap of faith.  The residency (think Black Mountain meets Project Runway) is modelled after a school and Atelier program Michael built in Atlanta FAWS - The Fine Art Workshop.

The theme for this residency was Folded based on the concept of folding into oneself, folding into another and how we hide and reveal within our art.  I worked with Michael David via FaceTime for a month prior to the residency discussing the concept for my project in order to prepare for my time in Bushwick.  These discussions were invaluable, enlightening and a safe space to share.  The goal was to create specific work for the gallery and then through interaction with each other, guest crits from Paul D'Agostino and artist/teacher Farrell Brickhouse and numerous conversations with Michael David evolve the work into a fluid, unified exhibit.

My installation titled 'Hide and Seek' addressed the questions of self-identity and acceptance.  Using myself as model - blatant and hidden in different components at the different stages of revealing oneself became a self-portrait.  This mixed media project enlisted the components of styrofoam, mylar, photography, polaroids and light to present a front facing image of my exterior shell that I present to the world.  Symbolic, confronting, strong and mutating the image is powerful.  The viewer is enticed to explore the installation unknowingly becoming voyeuristic.  The installation invites the viewer to intimately engage with the Polaroids revealing vulnerability and exposing a glimpse of my private world.  The timing for this concept is serendipitous, for the last two years I've been navigating the release of a life long program of addiction, hurt, anger and shame for being a gay man.  It's been a discovery of self-acceptance and authenticity stripping away to it's most basic and fundamental form, self-love.  Encompassing the themes of self-expression, body image, finding voice, reinvention and self-acceptance.  This residency helped me find freedom, both personally and professionally in my art career.

Joey Brock website

Joey Brock  “Hide and Seek”

Joey Brock “Hide and Seek”

Joey Brock  “Hide and Seek”

Joey Brock “Hide and Seek”

Joey Brock  “Hide and Seek”

Joey Brock “Hide and Seek”

Bonny Leibowitz

Bonny Leibowitz  “Not This, Not That”

Bonny Leibowitz “Not This, Not That”

Bonny Leibowitz

Not This, Not That

Here, in "Not This, Not That", I am drawing from Goya's powerful and disturbing painting; Witches Flight, three female witches flying in the air, a Male figure, cloaked in black, completely covering his head and face. The picture has space without environment. No register of air: no atmospheric movement.

Like Goya's Witches Flight; "Not This, Not That" is a synthesis and manifestation of inner truths. The floating bodies, condemned souls, represents for me, elements of the self, seeking understanding and acceptance, most importantly for the self. The Male figure; that part of us hiding from our truths.

The works in this series are as much about their own presence and “object-ness” as their underlying narratives related to the bodily self and consciousness.

Layers of acrylic, powdered pigments and ink on Tyvek, which I’ve manipulated with heat as a substrate, result in a history of pieces; shreds, which are then assembled as larger structures or exist alone as evidence in the broader sense. In the making of these works, I conceive of them as both physical parts and embodied thought, pieces of history falling away and the engagement of new experiences.

This and That

You are hidden, you are manifest both
not this, not that, yet this and that
how can you be hidden when you're eternally plain to see
_ Fakhr al-Din ‘Iraqi, Mystic Poet 1213-1289

Bonny Leibowitz website

 

Bonny Leibowitz   Not This, Not That  2018 Installation _ size variable  Tyvek, inks, acrylic and dry pigment  Folded Residency and Exhibition with Michael David, M. David & Co., Brooklyn, NY

Bonny Leibowitz

Not This, Not That
2018
Installation _ size variable
Tyvek, inks, acrylic and dry pigment

Folded Residency and Exhibition with Michael David, M. David & Co., Brooklyn, NY

Bonny Leibowitz   Not This, Not That - detail 2018 Installation _ size variable  Tyvek, inks, acrylic and dry pigment  Folded Residency and Exhibition with Michael David, M. David & Co., Brooklyn, NY

Bonny Leibowitz

Not This, Not That - detail
2018
Installation _ size variable
Tyvek, inks, acrylic and dry pigment

Folded Residency and Exhibition with Michael David, M. David & Co., Brooklyn, NY

Francesca Schwartz

Francesca Schwartz    The residencies I have engaged in with Michael David have had a profound and positive impact on my work. Michael has an uncanny knack for entering the process and addressing obstacles with each artist. There is nothing more useful in a teacher and a mentor than their ability to help you unblock yourself, without hindering the creative process. He is a master in creating an environment among the artists that is inspiring without being competitive, truly collaborative while identifying each person's voice. I am a devotee!    Francesca Schwartz: website

Francesca Schwartz

The residencies I have engaged in with Michael David have had a profound and positive impact on my work. Michael has an uncanny knack for entering the process and addressing obstacles with each artist. There is nothing more useful in a teacher and a mentor than their ability to help you unblock yourself, without hindering the creative process. He is a master in creating an environment among the artists that is inspiring without being competitive, truly collaborative while identifying each person's voice. I am a devotee!

Francesca Schwartz: website

Francesca Schwartz

Francesca Schwartz

Pilar Uribe

Pilar Uribe   This work is inspired by Rimbaud’s Drunken Ship and the Buddha’s Raft parable both of which questions what is broken , what is left behind and how we choose to move forward.  The Buddha’s Raft is a parable about a man needing to cross a dangerous river. He builds a raft to cross the river. While on the river the raft provides the safety but also the potential for death as any leak or breakage can leave him far from shore. He gets to the safety of the other shore but what of the raft? Does he leave the raft and appreciate the safety it provided, or does he carry it with him adding to his burdens crossing the next unpredictable terrain?  Where in our lives do we hang on to the past? As a single parent of a teenage daughter, whose father is an alcoholic, I am constantly teaching my daughter its ok to leave the raft behind. But what of me or any one of us? How many rafts are we carrying? This installation speaks to that journey of burden and release.  The boat is made from a seven foot square of Unryu paper with quilt designs in it.  The neon lights represent the bench in a canoe, the place that holds you while you need its support.  The neon light is the “enlightenment” we search for on our path.  The Quilt pattern of paper is symbolic of the lessons I learned from my grandmother as she taught me to quilt.  The idea is of the duality in our lives. The duality of courage and fear traveling together in the same waters.  Bowls/Vessels made of Encaustic Medium (Bees Wax with Damar Resin)  The bowls represent the IChing- where Heaven-large bowls all gold meet Earth-green bowls create Water- blue/purple bowls.  The Gold is the representation of the Enlightenment we seek and the blue and greens the earthly state we exist in.  This installation represents my journey of Courage vs Fear, Strength vs Weakness/despair, Color vs No Color. The broken bowls are also part of my journey’s expectation of perfection. Not only to find the imperfect but also being able to continue and allow the imperfect to represent me and who I am.  I was born in Cucuta, Colombia 1967 and moved to the US in 1971.  Pilar Uribe  website

Pilar Uribe

This work is inspired by Rimbaud’s Drunken Ship and the Buddha’s Raft parable both of which questions what is broken , what is left behind and how we choose to move forward.

The Buddha’s Raft is a parable about a man needing to cross a dangerous river. He builds a raft to cross the river. While on the river the raft provides the safety but also the potential for death as any leak or breakage can leave him far from shore. He gets to the safety of the other shore but what of the raft? Does he leave the raft and appreciate the safety it provided, or does he carry it with him adding to his burdens crossing the next unpredictable terrain?

Where in our lives do we hang on to the past? As a single parent of a teenage daughter, whose father is an alcoholic, I am constantly teaching my daughter its ok to leave the raft behind. But what of me or any one of us? How many rafts are we carrying? This installation speaks to that journey of burden and release.

The boat is made from a seven foot square of Unryu paper with quilt designs in it.

The neon lights represent the bench in a canoe, the place that holds you while you need its support.

The neon light is the “enlightenment” we search for on our path.

The Quilt pattern of paper is symbolic of the lessons I learned from my grandmother as she taught me to quilt.

The idea is of the duality in our lives. The duality of courage and fear traveling together in the same waters.

Bowls/Vessels made of Encaustic Medium (Bees Wax with Damar Resin)

The bowls represent the IChing- where Heaven-large bowls all gold meet Earth-green bowls create Water- blue/purple bowls.

The Gold is the representation of the Enlightenment we seek and the blue and greens the earthly state we exist in.

This installation represents my journey of Courage vs Fear, Strength vs Weakness/despair, Color vs No Color. The broken bowls are also part of my journey’s expectation of perfection. Not only to find the imperfect but also being able to continue and allow the imperfect to represent me and who I am.

I was born in Cucuta, Colombia 1967 and moved to the US in 1971.

Pilar Uribe website

Pilar Uribe

Pilar Uribe

Pilar Uribe

Pilar Uribe

Pilar Uribe

Pilar Uribe

Barbara Laube

Barbara Laube

Barbara Laube

For me the act of painting is spiritual, shamanistic, and transformative. Truth is found through process, the accidental, and the materiality of the paint. It is and always has been my way of making sense of my life, who I am, what I love, and what I believe in.

When I first started working with Michael David, there was the sense of time and my work both rushing and slowing. It is as if he is able to see the future. Time and again he has been a few beats ahead of my work. His saying, “The greater the risk, the greater the work,” and “why are you struggling, it’s a blessing to be in the studio,” has helped shift my practice from one of struggle to one of curiosity and even joy. The work is reflecting the openness and willingness.

Another profound experience was the crit with Paul D’Agostino during the Folded residency. I brought work in to see if it would hold the wall for my show at M.David &Co., I know! Paul had the idea to hang my diptych high, causing us to look up at the first half of the diptych- the heavens, and therefore to be at eye level with the very severe bottom half, thus reinforcing and maximizing the effect. It was another instance of the energy and transformation that happens amongst kindred spirits.

Barbara Laube: site

Barbara Laube

Barbara Laube

Barbara Laube

Barbara Laube

Barbara Laube

Barbara Laube